Сверхактивная сыворотка GIALUR

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Сверхактивная Сыворотка GIALUR




Giaour or Gawur (; Turkish: gâvur, Turkish pronunciation:&#;[ɟaˈʋur]; from Persian: گور‎ gâvor an obsolete variant of modern گبر gaur; Romanian: ghiaur; Albanian: Kaur; Greek: γκιαούρης, translit.&#;giaoúris) meaning "infidel", is an extremely offensive term, a slur, historically used in the Ottoman Empire for non-Muslims or more particularly Christians in the Balkans.[1][2] The terms kafir, gawur or rum (the latter meaning "Greek") were commonly used in defters (tax registries) for Orthodox Christians, usually without ethnic distinction.

Christian ethnic groups in the Balkan territory of the Ottoman Empire included Greeks (rum), Bulgarians (bulgar), Serbs (surf), Albanians (arnavut), and Vlachs (eflak), among others.[2]

The Encyclopædia Britannica described the term as follows:

Giaour (a Turkish adaptation of the Persiangdwr or gbr, an infidel), a word used by the Turks to describe all who are not Muslims, with especial reference to Christians.

The word, first employed as a term of contempt and reproach, has become so general that in most cases no insult is intended in its use; similarly, in parts of China, the term foreign devil has become void of offence. A strict analogy to giaour is found in the Arabic kafir, or unbeliever, which is so commonly in use as to have become the proper name of peoples and countries.

European cultural references[edit]

  • Giaour is the name given to the evil monster of a man in the tale Vathek, written by William Thomas Beckford in French in and translated into English soon after.

    The spelling Giaour appears in the French, as well as in the English translation.

  • In Lord Byron published his poem The Giaour: A Fragment of a Turkish Tale, whose themes revolve around the ideas of love, death, and afterlife in Western Europe and Ottoman Turkey.
  • Le Giaour, an painting by Ary Scheffer, oil on canvas, Musée de la Vie romantique, Hôtel Scheffer-Renan, Paris.

See also[edit]

Look up giaour in Wiktionary, the free dictionary.

Notes[edit]

References[edit]

  • &#;This article&#;incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain:&#;Chisholm, Hugh, ed.

    (). "Giaour". Encyclopædia Britannica. 11 (11th ed.). Cambridge University Press. p.&#;&#;

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